Meeting NFPA 86: Maintenance

We've discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86, this week let's take a closer look at the sixth monitoring requirment: maintenance.

The system should be designed to provide the least amount of downtime, including routine calibration and maintenance of the sampling system and sensor.

Calibration frequency depends on sensor type:

Meeting NFPA 86: Failsafe Malfunction Logic

We've discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86, this week let's take a closer look at the fifth monitoring requirement: failsafe malfunction logic.

According to section 11.6.10.8 of NFPA 86, "alarms shall be provided to indicate any sample, flow, circuit or controller power failures."

Meeting NFPA 86: Avoiding Condensation

We've discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86, this week let's take a closer look at the fourth monitoring requirement: avoiding condensation.

NFPA 86 Section 11.6.10.11 requires that “the sensor and sample system shall be maintained at a temperature that prevents condensation.”

Condensation of any part of the vaporized sample will create two types of problems:

Meeting NFPA 86: Reading Error

An interesting conversation arose after last week's discussion on calibration accuracy. What happens when a variety of solvents are used in a process? 

A note in NFPA 86 section 11.6.10.6 states “Where a variety of solvents are used, the solvent to which the controller is least sensitive shall be the primary calibration reference.”

Meeting NFPA 86: Calibration Accuracy

We've discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86, this week let's take a closer look at the third monitoring requirement: calibration accuracy.

Meeting NFPA 86: Speed of Response

We've discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86, this week let's take a closer look at the second monitoring requirment: Speed of Response.

Meeting NFPA 86: Active Sampling System

Last week we discussed the 6 essentials of meeting NFPA 86. Let’s take a closer look at the first monitoring requirement: Sample delivery system (section 11.6.10.11).

It is recommended that process applications employ active sample draw systems to continuously deliver a sample to the solvent vapor monitor. 

Why?

The 6 Essentials of Meeting NFPA 86

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) establishes fire safety standards, including standards for the safe operation of processes. In our world we focus specifically on NFPA86, THE Standard for Ovens and Furnaces. 

It addresses the safe operation of Class A, Class B, Class C, and Class D ovens, dryers, and furnaces, thermal oxidizers, and any other heated enclosure used for processing of materials and related equipment.

FTA vs IR: Response Factors

The industry standard accuracy requirement for a flammable gas sensor is +/-10%. Response factors are therefore one of the most significant influences on accuracy, and can easily introduce large errors. Let's examine this concept when comparing FTA vs IR for process applications.

FTA vs IR: Response Accuracy

When comparing FTA vs IR for process applications, its important to remember that few analyzers react the same way to all substances.

IR Response

An infrared sensor is a narrow-band instrument. It can usually discriminate between the substance of interest and background gases but it does not respond to gases outside of it's narrow range of vision.

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